A historical myth in procedural medicine is the operator should limit removal of pleural fluid to 1.5 L during thoracentesis because of the risk of re-expansion pulmonary edema or pneumothorax.  New evidence supports safety of large volume thoracentesis until no…
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The internal jugular or subclavian veins have fewer combined mechanical or infectious complications for central venous catheter insertions compared with femoral vein CVC placements.  Numerous organizations have proposed guidelines or central line bundles that have advocated preferential use of the…
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Original studies of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis concluded a 2% risk of pneumothorax. A recent single center study of 9320 thoracenteses over 12 years all by procedural experts had pneumothorax rate of 0.6%. This same study also demonstrated a very low incidence…
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Thoracentesis is one of the most common bedside procedures performed in U.S. hospitals.  There are about 173,000 thoracenteses performed each year in the U.S.  A systematic review and meta-analysis in 2010 concluded that thoracentesis-related pneumothorax occurs 6% of the time…
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