Does Simulation Based Training Improve Central Line Success Rates? Simulation-based procedural training has become increasingly popular in academic medical centers and among medical trainees.  Limited data has suggested that simulation based training improves success rates and safety, but evidence has…
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Timely administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics in septic patients saves lives.  Though this has been demonstrated in hundreds of clinical investigations over the last few decades, antibiotics remain the most controversial topic in the management of severe sepsis and septic shock. …
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Malpositioned central venous catheters occurs in about 7% of central line placements. A malpositioned central line is any central venous catheter where the tip is located anywhere other than the superior vena cava (SVC) for internal jugular lines or subclavian…
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The SARS-COV-2 pandemic started in January 2020 and has decimated the majority of U.S. hospitals for the past 18 months. The impact of COVID-19 has not only affected available hospital beds, but has limited the ability of hospitals to perform…
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Based on several studies, central line malposition occurs between 3.3-6.7% of the time.1  The historical recommendation is that malpositioned central lines should not be used for long periods of time, if at all.  The basis for these recommendations is based…
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The internal jugular or subclavian veins have fewer combined mechanical or infectious complications for central venous catheter insertions compared with femoral vein CVC placements.  Numerous organizations have proposed guidelines or central line bundles that have advocated preferential use of the…
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The goal of zero device-related infections is what CMS desires for all hospitals, but is not a realistic goal.  Nevertheless, we can do everything in our power to minimize central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).  We now can appreciate that the…
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