This study was an observational cohort study of adult patients who had an in-hospital cardiac arrest between 2000 through 2014.   A US-based multicenter registry of in-hospital cardiac arrest was studied and included 108,079 adult patients at 668 hospitals. Two…
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Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA) have a survival rate of only 8-10%.  The most critical factors for patient survival is the early administration of good bystander CPR and early defibrillation in shockable rhythms.  Currently, defibrillators are transported to OHCA victims only…
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The Universal Termination of Resuscitation Guidelines suggest that resuscitation should be terminated if at least four rounds of CPR have occurred and the following three criteria are met: The arrest was NOT witnessed by emergency medical services (EMS) There has…
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The 2015 American Heart Association Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support guidelines deemphasizes advanced airway placement during the initial resuscitation. Out-of-hospital–arrest data suggest lower survival among patients who are intubated in the field.  Therefore, it is important to determine the importance of…
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After three defibrillation attempts, recommendations state that amiodarone or lidocaine may be considered for patients with cardiac arrest and persistent shockable rhythm.  A randomized, controlled trial was conducted and showed there was no significant difference between amiodarone and lidocaine and…
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These guidelines are for physicians who care for patients with return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after cardiac arrest, including emergency physicians, critical care physicians, and cardiologists These guidelines update the 2010 International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation guidelines for patients with…
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Cardiac arrest patients who were intubated had similar outcomes to those who had a supraglottic airway device (e.g., King tube) inserted in the pre-hospital setting. A literature review of 5 studies and over 300,000 patients with pre-hospital cardiac arrest demonstrated…
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Mild hypothermia is standard of care for comatose survivors after cardiac arrest.  Now there is new evidence that survivors of PEA arrest do better neurologically compared with survivors of VF/VT arrests.  A retrospective, single-center study shows comatose survivors with shockable…
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